Factory wholesale price for Automatic Transfer Switching Equipment-FTQ2E to Botswana Manufacturers

Overview:



Technical data

Product illustration

Tripping characteristic

Exterior and dimensions

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In order to best meet client's needs, all of our operations are strictly performed in line with our motto " High Quality, Competitive Price, Fast Service " for Factory wholesale price for Automatic Transfer Switching Equipment-FTQ2E to Botswana Manufacturers, We welcome you to inquire us by call or mail and hope to build a successful and cooperative relationship.


Body switch FTB2-63 MCB Series
Rated voltage (V): AC 400(4P/3P); AC 230V(2P)/50HZ
Rated insulation voltage: 440
Rated impulse withstand voltage Uimp(KV): 4
Rated breaking Capacity: 6.5
Mechanical and electrical life: electric 6000
Machinery 10000
Operating position: Normally on,backup on,Normal and backup off
Operating transfer time: ≤1.5
Electrical class: CB
Usage category: AC-33iB
Controller functions:
switch automaticly in condition of phase loss, pressure loss ,undervoltage and other power failure,
automatic change and automatic recovery ,automatic change and non automatic recovery,fire fighting
joint control, Manual/automatic adjustion,power/power on/tripping indication,fault alarm
Controller Operating Voltage: AC230V/50Hz
Undervoltage conversion value: AC175V(±5)
Undervoltage  return value: AC190V(±5)
Conversion Delay(normal to backup): 0S-60S adjustable,factory default setting:5S
Return Delay(normal to backup: 0S-60S adjustable,factory default setting:5S
Size(L×W×H)mm: 248 × 125×121




Daly Electric call now: 859-333-1509 or 859-396-7331

http://davedalyky.wix.com/daly-electric

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An electrician is a tradesman specializing in electrical wiring of buildings, stationary machines and related equipment. Electricians may be employed in the installation of new electrical components or the maintenance and repair of existing electrical infrastructure.[1] Electricians may also specialize in wiring ships, airplanes and other mobile platforms.
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Above from – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrician



Disclaimer: This video is to show the way I did the job of upgrading my 10/3 feeder wire. I am not showing the way all the experts watching would do it. I am a licensed aircraft avionics (electrician) not a home electrician:I did not cut a long opening in the drywall. This sub-panel was inspected by an electrical underwriter back in 1985. Now I am wiring my new workshop with an existing sub-panel I had installed back in 1985. I am a licensed aircraft technician and was allowed by the town code board to wire my own one family house wiring, including connecting to the incoming power company wiring that terminated on a pole connected to my house, this was back in 1985, I do not think that is allowed anymore.Now I am updating the size to 10/3 coming from the sub-panel to the underground UV cable I had buried back in 1985. The two 30 amp switches I have been using, although renewed, could be eliminated and just use the sub panel circuit breakers when your not using shed power, also I am installing an 8 foot copper rod, pounded into the ground and connected to the shed box neutral bar using unshielded solid # 4 copper wire with the required rod clamp. The main house neutral bar is also connected to a #4 solid copper ground wire unbroken to the pipe below the house’s main water shut off valve and continues out of the house and connected to an 8 foot copper rod with heavy required clamp.This gets pounded below the dirt close to the foundation. Over 616 HD Video

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